New peace deal for Colombia

After more than 52 years of war and six weeks since the original deal was rejected in a referendum, the government of Colombia and the FARC rebels have agreed on a revised peace deal in which proposals from the opposition have been incorporated.

The government has not mentioned holding a second plebiscite to approve the deal yet, although some opposition figures have already demanded one. Copies of the new peace agreement will be made public next Sunday.

The new deal will not change a controversial part which gives the FARC 10 congressional seats through 2026 or stop rebel leaders from being elected to political posts. Nevertheless, the peace agreement will not be integrated into Colombia’s constitution and the rebel group will be required to present a complete record of its capital proprieties, which will be destined for compensation of victims. Moreover, it specifies that the FARC must turn in exhaustive information about its involvement in the drug trade.

All in all, former president Alvaro Uribe, who led opposition to the previous peace deal, is not satisfied with the modified deal.

USA and Russia agreement

The diplomats meeting in Munich agreed Friday to a cease fire in Syria’s long-running civil war and instead focus all efforts in bringing humanitarian aid to the country and millions of displaced people. The Secretary of State of the US, John Kerry, announced after meeting with the Russian Secretary and other diplomats that their aim was for the fire to cease within a week, at least from their respective sides. However, a complete cease fire seems almost impossible, as it would depend on hundreds of rebel groups also deciding to stop fighting.

This announcement signifies a huge development in a war that has already killed more than 250,000 civilians and has created the world’s worst refugee crisis since the Holocaust.